Last edited by Taujar
Monday, July 27, 2020 | History

3 edition of The case of the Quakers concerning oaths found in the catalog.

The case of the Quakers concerning oaths

The case of the Quakers concerning oaths

defended as evangelical in answer to a book, entituled, The case of the Quakers relating to oaths stated by J.S.

  • 383 Want to read
  • 35 Currently reading

Published by s.n.] in [London? .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • J. S.,
  • Society of Friends -- Doctrines.,
  • Oaths -- Biblical teaching -- Early works to 1800.

  • Edition Notes

    GenreEarly works to 1800.
    SeriesEarly English books, 1641-1700 -- 930:10.
    The Physical Object
    FormatMicroform
    Pagination51 p.
    Number of Pages51
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL16754271M

    Quakers became accepted as a denomination and many colonies' constitutions exempted them from giving oaths in court. Quakers distanced themselves from society through their simple clothing and plain language (e.g. the use of "thee" and "thou" in place of "you"). John Perrot, Quaker Last update = 28 Mar Comments? Corrections? Additions? Please write.. The origin of John the Quaker remains unknown. The following passage may provide a clue that might link him to the William Parrott family of Talbot Co., Maryland. Alternatively, it may simply be a case of Quakers associating with Quakers.

      To order these books at a discount go to or call Free UK p&p over £10, online orders only. Free UK p&p . " All oaths are unlawful and contrary to the Word of God.—Quakers. " An oath obligeth not in the sense of the imposer, but the taker's.—Sheriff's Case. " Dominion is founded in grace. "

      Readers of early Quaker literature cannot fail to be aware of the history of religious persecution of the Quakers in the seventeenth century. Although the Act of Toleration of marked the end of its most extreme forms, Quakers continued to be subject to confiscation of goods, fines and imprisonment for refusing to pay church tithes or take oaths, and to be excluded from public office. Quakers also avoid creeds and hierarchical structures. The different Quaker denominations that exist today include evangelical, holiness, liberal, and traditional. Original Quakers had meetings with no planned services; most of the meetings were held in silence, until (and if) .


Share this book
You might also like
Guide to the collections

Guide to the collections

Defiance and devotion

Defiance and devotion

Lost Battalion.

Lost Battalion.

Mathematics Exploring Your World

Mathematics Exploring Your World

Dental students reactions to community dentistry as a subject and a program

Dental students reactions to community dentistry as a subject and a program

Annual report of the certification officer.

Annual report of the certification officer.

Inside the Philippine revolution

Inside the Philippine revolution

His excellency George Dunk, Earl of Hallifax, Lord Lieutenant General, and General Governor of Ireland

His excellency George Dunk, Earl of Hallifax, Lord Lieutenant General, and General Governor of Ireland

75th anniversary.

75th anniversary.

Decisions on names in Colombia.

Decisions on names in Colombia.

Just Another Gorg Guy

Just Another Gorg Guy

Leonardo da Vinci

Leonardo da Vinci

Drinking water & forestry

Drinking water & forestry

The case of the Quakers concerning oaths Download PDF EPUB FB2

A second testimony concerning oaths and swearing in answer to a book entituled The case of the Quakers relating to oathes stated by J.S., or, An to Allan Smallwood, by Gervase Benson.

() [Benson, Gervase] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. A second testimony concerning oaths and swearing in answer to a book entituled The case of the Quakers relating to Author: Gervase Benson.

Get this from a library. A second testimony concerning oaths and swearing: in answer to a book entituled The case of the Quakers relating to oathes stated by J.S., or, An appendix to a book written in the year in answer to Allan Smallwood wherein is fully cleared the command of Christ and practice of the apostles concerning swearing from the corrupt glosses, limited sense and meaning.

The case of the Quakers concerning oaths defended as evangelical in answer to a book, entituled, The case of the Quakers relating to oaths stated by :. George Whitehead. The case of the Quakers concerning oaths, defended as evangelical: containing an answer to Charles Gataker's late examination of the case of the Quakers (which he faith, is humbly submitted to the judgment of his most sacred Majesty, and the two houses of Parliament), as being included in J.S.

his precedent state of their case, and comprehensively and seriously answered herein, on the behalf. A second testimony concerning oaths and swearing in answer to a book entituled The case of the Quakers relating to oathes stated by J.S., or, An appendix to a book written in the year in answer to Allan Smallwood wherein is fully cleared the command of Christ and practice of the apostles concerning swearing from the corrupt glosses, limited sense and meaning of J.S.

/ by Gervase : d. Gervase Benson. This data is provided as an additional tool in helping to insure edition identification: ++++ To the anti-Quaker Misorcus concerning oaths Anti-Quaker Richardson, Richard. Caption title. Signed: R.R. Place and date of publication suggested by Wing.

7 : Richard Richardson. The case of the Quakers concerning oaths: defended as evangelical in answer to a book, entituled, The case of the Quakers relating to oaths stated by J.S. by: Whitehead, George.

Published: (). Quakers, or the Religious Society of Friends, was founded in England in the 17th century by George Fox and played a key role in abolition and women’s suffrage.

To have the Effect of an Oath. The equivalent of this act which is now in practice is the Oaths Act ofwhich you can find at It doesn’t mention Quakers explicitly anymore, but still explains that affirmations are as good as oaths: Solemn affirmations 5 Making of solemn affirmations.

The Religious Society of Friends began as a movement in England in the midth century in s are informally known as Quakers, as they were said "to tremble in the way of the Lord".The movement in its early days faced strong opposition and persecution, but it continued to expand across the British Isles and then in the Americas and Africa.

Whitehead, George. The accuser of our brethren cast down in righteous judgment against that spirit of hellish jealousie vented in a great confused book, falsly entituled, The Christian-Quaker distinguished from the apostate and innovator, in five parts ; the fallacy and force whereof being herein clearly detected & justly repelled.

Naylor, James, An Answer to a Book called the Quakers Catechism. Benson, A Second Testimony concerning Oaths, p. Bishop, A Vindication of the Principles.

A Brief Manifestation or the State and Case of the Quakers presented to all people (London, ), p. The Quakers came into existence during the uproar when England fought a civil war, deleted a king, founded a start-up republic, and then rebooted the king (a new one, not the one they’d deleted).

And whenever people found some down time, they argued about religion. And you thought we were living through interesting times. Let’s start the tale with George Fox. Quaker refusal to take oaths and to take off their hats before a magistrate, and their insistence on holding banned religious meetings in public, led to 6, Quakers.

In the 17th century, certain sects of Christendom, such as the Anabaptists and, later, the Quakers, denied the legitimacy of taking oaths or making vows.

The teaching of chapter 23 of the Baptist Confession was designed to clarify the meaning and confirm the lawfulness of oaths. This entry was posted in Bad Quaker and the Constitution of The United States, Bad Quaker and War., Bad Quaker Theology, Voluntaryism and Law and tagged constitution of the united states, constitutional government, duty, honor, individual responsability, legitimate government, oath, oaths, quakers, religious society of friends, second amendment.

But even citing Exodus is incorrect—Quakers refuse to swear oaths because they take literally biblical passages such as Matthew –37, where Jesus says, “Do not swear an oath at all. The Quakers were serious about this, and because they were among the Founding Fathers of the United States of America, they worked hard to ensure that people would have the freedom not to take oaths.

The US Constitution prescribes an oath or affirmation for the presidential inauguration. An affirmation is different from an oath in two respects.

The Online Books Page. Online Books by. George Fox (Fox, George, ) Online books about this author are available, as is a Wikipedia article. Fox, George, Concerning Revelation, Prophecy, Measure, and Rule: and the Inspiration and Sufficiency of the Spirit (HTML at ) Fox, George, George Fox, an Autobiography, ed.

by Rufus M. Jones (HTML at CCEL). One of the threads running through the book is the importance within Quaker testimony of the emphasis on denial, refusal, and/or rejection of systemic privilege of some groups over others.

In the case of both oaths and the refusal to engage in combat, the practices. The Book of Discipline Revision Preparation Group invites you to join with us, and other Quakers across the country, in reading and getting to know our current Book of Discipline.

Read more → Religious Society of Friends (Quakers) • Friends House, Euston Road, London NW1 2BJ • telephone • Registered charity number.The Quakers were one of the most radical groups emerging from the English Reformation, and in the s they founded Pennsylvania.

Quakers were pacifists and refused military service. They also objected to the swearing of oaths, a common practice in courts and in the seating of political officials. Fox's movement ran afoul of Oliver Cromwell's Puritan government, as well as that of Charles II when the monarchy was restored.

Fox's followers, called Friends, refused to pay tithes to the state church, would not take oaths in court, declined to doff their hats to those in power, and refused to serve in combat during war. Further, Fox and his followers fought for the end of slavery and more.